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Guidance on how to support your child's learning

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This information is intended to give you an understanding of what is taught in each year and how you can help your child.

 

Most of these ideas are very simple and many of you will be doing them already. However, if you are not, these skills will be of great benefit to your child.

 

Please try to make all of the activities fun and enjoyable and be sure to praise and encourage your child.

 

 

Basic Skills

 

By teaching your child some basic skills you will be helping their literacy, numeracy and independence thus raising their self – esteem and developing their confidence.

 

Please teach them:

 

  • to dress and undress, coping with fastenings

  • to say their name, address and telephone number

  • the sounds and names of letters of the alphabet

  • counting rhymes e.g. I,2,3,4,5,once I caught a fish alive, and counting everyday objects e.g. count out 4 plates for tea

  • the days of the week in the correct order, referring to what is done on that day. Sunday being the first day of the week

  • months of the year; draw attention to family birthdays, special festivals etc

  • how to tell the time. Start with o’clock and move on to half past. Use daily routines to highlight times e.g. 12 o’clock dinner time

  • the difference between left and right. Setting the table is a good activity for this

  • tie their shoelaces

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Games

 

Children learn without realising it while playing games. They also need practice at taking turns and learning to win or lose.

 

Either commercial/shop bought or home made games can be used.

 

Examples:

 

  • matching games, matching pictures, colours, numbers or words

     

  • snap cards, dominoes, lotto games

     

  • I spy

     

  • Kim’s game (items shown to a child and covered, child to see how many items he/she can remember)

     

  • Guessing games e.g. how many apples do you think are in the bowl?

     

  • Board games, e.g. snakes and ladders

     

  • Puzzles, e.g. wordsearches, crosswords etc

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Speaking and Listening

 

Encourage your child to talk to you, other children and other adults. This will help to develop their vocabulary, organisation, sequencing skills and confidence.

 

Encourage your child to:

 

  • pronounce words correctly

     

  • use full sentences in speech

     

  • sing songs and rhymes

     

  • talk about things they enjoy

     

  • retell well known stories

     

  • talk about family outings

     

  • talk about school

     

  • listen to stories and rhymes

     

  • answer questions about a story they have just heard, e.g. ‘Why was Little Red Riding Hood going to Granny’s house?’

     

  • listen to others speaking

     

  • take turns in a conversation

     

  • play listening games such as Lotto

     

  • follow simple instructions e.g. ‘put the cups on top of the cupboard’.

Reading

  • ensure that your children see you reading – books, newspapers, leaflets
  • read to your children
  • encourage them to talk about the pictures and the story. Ask questions such as ‘What do you think will happen?’
  • talk about the way that books are set out ‘Where do we start reading?’ ‘How do we find out who wrote the book?’
  • encourage children to read signs and labels, for example when shopping
  • encourage them to read road signs (especially on a long journey)
  • ensure that your children have access to different types of reading materials, e.g. story books, comics, birthday cards etc
  • encourage them to read books borrowed from our newly refurbished library
  • visit the library or book shops – or get books from jumble sales or at Wolsey School Fayres
  • ask them to read aloud daily
  • be patient
  • give them plenty of time to try out new words
  • if they are stuck on a word and can’t read it, tell them it and move on (don’t ask them to sound it out)
  • encourage them to use pictures as a clue to the text/words
  • always be encouraging and use plenty of praise, Praise all efforts
  • try reading in the morning if evening is ‘stressful’ and your child is tired
  • encourage them to retell stories in the correct sequence/order of event
  • let them choose their own reading materials

Don’t

  • show your disappointment if your child no longer remembers words they previously knew
  • be impatient
  • criticise their choice of reading materials
  • be agitated or cross if your child does not want to read

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Paired Reading

 

Paired reading is especially useful for parents and children to do at home. One child works alongside one adult. The adult and the child read the text aloud together. In this way the adult provides the child with a model of correct reading.

                                                                                                                                            

Procedures for Paired Reading

 

  • The child chooses a book to read, sometimes with guidance
  • Adult and child sit together and begin reading aloud together. The child should always set the pace
  • The child must pronounce all words correctly. If the child gives an incorrect word, the adult gives the correct model and the child repeats it. Both continue reading as before
  • If the child wishes to read a little on his some non-verbal signal is given
  • During this independent reading the adult gives praise and encouragement especially if errors are self-corrected
  • When the child is reading independently and is unsure of a word, the adult must join in again. Paired reading then continues until the child signals to go on alone
  • The adult should stop and talk about the book to the child. This could be by talking about the pictures or predicting what will happen on the next page

 

Please remember:

 

Children’s progress is uneven so one day your child may read fluently and the next day they may stumble over words.

Spelling

 

If your child asks you how to spell a word write it down and encourage them to:

 

LOOK at the word

SAY the word

COVER it up

WRITE it down

CHECK if it is right

PRAISE ALL EFFORTS

 

If it is right:                       encourage them to use the word regularly and correctly

 

 

If it is wrong:                    praise the effort and encourage them to practise until they get it right

 

 

LOOK  - SAY – COVER -  WRITE -  CHECK

 

Repeat this every time your child asks to spell a word.

 

Writing

 

Encourage your child to:                                                                                        

 

        

  • hold a pencil correctly

     

  • experiment with pencils, pens and crayons

     

  • draw, paint and colour

     

  • keep within the lines when colouring

     

  • trace over pictures, letters, numbers and words

     

  • form letters and numbers correctly (please see letter formation sheets – one for right handed children, the other for those who are left handed

     

  • always write from left to right

     

  • have a go!

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Mathematics

 

Talk to your child, use the language of numbers, shape, size, position, time and money as you go about your daily life.

 

Help them to:

 

  • begin to recognise number words and symbols and to understand how to use them to count

  • understand and use comparing words like “less”, “more”, “smaller”, ”heavier”

  • put things in order and use words like “first”, “second”, “before”, “next”

  • learn words of position like “left”, “right”, “top”, “below” “in front”

  • make patterns and talk about how they do it

     

    Meal times

     

    Suggested questions and tasks:

     

    Do we need small plates or big plates?

    Please give a knife and fork to each person.

    Have we got enough biscuits to have two each?

    Will this glass hold more drink than that one?

     

     

    At the supermarket

     

    Please put three grapefruit in the basket.

    We need the biggest size of cornflakes.

    Are there more people in this queue than in that one?

    Is this tin heavier than that one?

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Helping your child in Year 1 or Year 2 (Classes 1 to 4 - age 5 to 7)

 

In these years, your child is likely to learn to:

 

  • count up to 20, and then on to 100 and more

  • read and write these numbers and put them in order

  • know the pairs of numbers which add up to 10, like 1 and 9, 4 and 6

  • add and subtract numbers less than 10 in their head, going on to do the same with numbers to 20

  • double and halve numbers to 20 and beyond

  • know the 2 and 10 times tables, and others up to 5x5

  • recognise and name common shapes like the square, circle, cube and cylinder

  • compare the lengths, weights, capacities of objects, and later be able to measure using meters, centimetres, kilograms and litres

  • recognise coins to £1, find simple totals and give change

     

    The really important things in these years are:

     

  • for children to do their number work with actual objects until they can do the sums in their head

     

  • for them to learn to work as much as possible out in their heads

     

for the children to use the facts they know to help them work out new answers. For example:

            7+7 is 14, so 7+8 must be 15

            you can work out double 13 by adding double 10 to double 3

 

Each of these skills comes best from lots of talking and explaining through practical examples.

 

 

Helping your child in Year 1 or Year 2 (Classes 1 to 4 - age 5 to 7)

 

 In these years, your child is likely to learn to:

 

  • count up to 20, and then on to 100 and more
  • read and write these numbers and put them in order
  • know the pairs of numbers which add up to 10, like 1 and 9, 4 and 6
  • add and subtract numbers less than 10 in their head, going on to do the same with numbers to 20
  • double and halve numbers to 20 and beyond
  • know the 2 and 10 times tables, and others up to 5x5
  • recognise and name common shapes like the square, circle, cube and cylinder
  • compare the lengths, weights, capacities of objects, and later be able to measure using meters, centimetres, kilograms and litres
  • recognise coins to £1, find simple totals and give change

 

 The really important things in these years are:

 

  • for children to do their number work with actual objects until they can do the sums in their head
  •  
  • for them to learn to work as much as possible out in their heads
  •  
  •  for the children to use the facts they know to help them work out new answers. For example:
  •             7+7 is 14, so 7+8 must be 15

            you can work out double 13 by adding double 10 to double 3

 

Each of these skills comes best from lots of talking and explaining through practical examples.

 

 

Helping your child in Year 3 or Year 4 (Classes 5 to 8 – age 7 to 9)

 

In these years your child is likely to learn to:

 

  • understand and use numbers to 1000
  • know all the addition and subtraction facts to 20 e.g. 5+7 = 12 or 18-3 = 15
  • work out sums such as 43+28 and 64-21 and later 64-38 in their head
  • extend mental methods to work out sums like 145+283 and 365-192 on paper
  • know the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, and later tables 3 and 4
  • multiply by 10 and 100
  • multiply and divide numbers up to 100 by 2,3,4,5,10 and understand remainders
  • begin to understand and use simple fractions such as
  • begin to understand decimals through their use in money and measurement, e.g. £3.47 or 5.19m
  • tell the time to the nearest minute
  • recognise and use properties of shapes such as symmetry, right angle, lengths
  • use and interpret simple graphs

 

The really important things in these years are:

 

For children to use the facts they know to work out new answers. For example:

 

There are many ways to work out 43+28 in your head. One way is to add 40+20 to get 60, then add on the 3 and 8. Another is to add 20 to 43 to get 63, move on to 7 to 70 and a final 1 to get the answer 71.

 

Similarly, a child might do 64-38 by counting on from 38

 

To work out 5x13, say “I know 5x10 is 50 and 5x3 is 15, so the answer is 65.”

 

 

Helping your child in Year 5 or Year 6 (class 9 to 13  age 9 to 11)

 

In these years, your child is likely to be working on:

 

  • tables up to 10x10, and using what they know to help multiply and divide bigger numbers in their head and on paper
  • understanding decimals (for instance that 1.07 is one and seven hundredths) and using them, particularly in measurement
  • addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with decimals, often in measurement or money
  • how and when to use a calculator; understanding the answers they get and checking that they make sense
  • simple problems about ratio, such as “you need 2 eggs, 300ml milk and 240g flour to make pancakes for 4 people. What do you need for 6?”
  • beginning to understand simple percentages, for instance that 10% of £25 is £2.50
  • how to estimate answers, for instance that the cost of 29 calculators at £3.95 each will be roughly 30x£4 = £120
  • measuring angles with a protractor
  • working out the areas of simple shapes like rectangles and triangles
  • collecting numerical information and putting it into tables, graphs and charts

 

 The really important things in these years are:

 

for children to grow in confidence in sorting out what to do and how to do it when they are faced with a problem is

 

1. for the children to begin to see connections, for instance that:

  • addition ‘reverses’ subtraction, or multiplication ‘undoes’ division
  • fractions, decimals, ratios and percentages are just different ways of saying the same thing

 

2. for children to have many opportunities to use their maths at home, at the shops, on trips and visits and to see numbers and shape, and measurement and graphs at work in the world around them

 

Tables

 

Help your child to learn to use the patterns in the tables. Help them to use the table facts they remember easily to get to those which are harder:

 

  • you can always say it the other way round – three eights are 24, so are eight three 3x8 = 8x3 
  • children usually find facts like six sixes (6x6)= 36, seven sevens (7x7) = 49 are easily learnt by their sound. Use them to reach others – for instance eight sixes will be six sixes and two more sixes: 8x6 will be 6x6 and 2x6: 36 +12 is 48, or eight sevens will be seven more than 49

 

once they know the 2 times, 5 times, 10 times and 3 times tables, they can quickly reach the others and learn them:

  for example

  “two sevens are 14, so four sevens will be twice 14”

    2x7 = 14  so 4x7 will be twice 14

                                                           

 “five fours (four fives) are twenty – 5x4 and 4x5 = 20 – seven fours are 8 more, that is 28”

 

 

Helping your child in Year 3 or Year 4 (Classes 5 to 8 – age 7 to 9)

 

In these years your child is likely to learn to:

 

  • understand and use numbers to 1000

  • know all the addition and subtraction facts to 20 e.g. 5+7 = 12 or 18-3 = 15

  • work out sums such as 43+28 and 64-21 and later 64-38 in their head

  • extend mental methods to work out sums like 145+283 and 365-192 on paper

  • know the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, and later tables 3 and 4

  • multiply by 10 and 100

  • multiply and divide numbers up to 100 by 2,3,4,5,10 and understand remainders

  • begin to understand and use simple fractions such as

  • begin to understand decimals through their use in money and measurement, e.g. £3.47 or 5.19m

  • tell the time to the nearest minute

  • recognise and use properties of shapes such as symmetry, right angle, lengths

  • use and interpret simple graphs

     

    The really important things in these years are:

     

    For children to use the facts they know to work out new answers. For example:

     

    There are many ways to work out 43+28 in your head. One way is to add 40+20 to get 60, then add on the 3 and 8. Another is to add 20 to 43 to get 63, move on to 7 to 70 and a final 1 to get the answer 71.

     

    Similarly, a child might do 64-38 by counting on from 38

     

    To work out 5x13, say “I know 5x10 is 50 and 5x3 is 15, so the answer is 65.”

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Helping your child in Year 5 or Year 6 (class 9 to 13  age 9 to 11)

     

    In these years, your child is likely to be working on:

     

  • tables up to 10x10, and using what they know to help multiply and divide bigger numbers in their head and on paper

  • understanding decimals (for instance that 1.07 is one and seven hundredths) and using them, particularly in measurement

  • addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with decimals, often in measurement or money

  • how and when to use a calculator; understanding the answers they get and checking that they make sense

  • simple problems about ratio, such as “you need 2 eggs, 300ml milk and 240g flour to make pancakes for 4 people. What do you need for 6?”

  • beginning to understand simple percentages, for instance that 10% of £25 is £2.50

  • how to estimate answers, for instance that the cost of 29 calculators at £3.95 each will be roughly 30x£4 = £120

  • measuring angles with a protractor

  • working out the areas of simple shapes like rectangles and triangles

  • collecting numerical information and putting it into tables, graphs and charts

     

     

    The really important things in these years are:

     

  • for children to grow in confidence in sorting out what to do and how to do itwhen they are faced with a problem

     

  • for children to begin to see connections, for instance that:

                                                           addition ‘reverses’ subtraction, or multiplication ‘undoes’ division

                                                           fractions, decimals, ratios and percentages are just different                    

                                                                 ways of saying the same thing

     

  • for children to have many opportunities to use their maths at home, at the shops, on trips and visits and to see numbers and shape, and measurement and graphs at work in the world around them

     

    Tables

     

    Help your child to learn to use the patterns in the tables. Help them to use the table facts they remember easily to get to those which are harder:

     

  • you can always say it the other way round – three eights are 24, so are eight threes

                 3x8 = 8x3

     

  • children usually find facts like six sixes (6x6)= 36, seven sevens (7x7) = 49 are easily learnt by their sound. Use them to reach others – for instance eight sixes will be six sixes and two more sixes: 8x6 will be 6x6 and 2x6: 36 +12 is 48, or eight sevens will be seven more than 49

     

once they know the 2 times, 5 times, 10 times and 3 times tables, they can quickly reache the others and learn them: for example

  • “two sevens are 14, so four sevens will be twice 14” 2x7 = 14  so 4x7 will be twice 14

                                                           

  •  “five fours (four fives) are twenty – 5x4 and 4x5 = 20 – seven fours are 8 more, that’s 28”

 

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